How Dogs are Helping Elephants

Throughout the Nairobi’s Jomo Kenyatta International Airport and other airports in Africa, dogs are being trained to sniff Ivory.  The ivory from elephants is used in the making of X-Ray machines and screeners and is becoming increasingly rare.  The elephant population in Africa is decreasing rapidly because they are being killed for their ivory.  Rocco is an ivory sniffing dog who is let go in airports and sniffs people’s luggage.  If someone is caught with ivory hidden in their suitcase, they are arrested by the authorities.

 

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/04/160427-kenya-wildlife-service-sniffer-dogs-smuggled-ivory-airport-port-elephant-poaching/

 

What Happened To The Biggest Shark Ever

The shark featured in  JAWS and many other TV shows and movies mysteriously disappeared and nobody knows why.  Also known as Carcharocles megalodon, the megatooth species died about 2.5 million years ago.  Scientists like to equate its sudden death with a change in water temperature in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans (where these sharks could be found).  However, many are in disbelief that a huge man-eating shark could be taken down by a simple change in temperature.

El Nino Breaks 18 Year Wave Drought

El Nino was a blessing for Hawaii this year.  Last Thursday the Quicksilver surf competition was able to run because the waves were bigger than they have been in 18 years.  This is due to the El Nino waves.  In the surf competition’s history it has only been able to run 9 times in the past 33 years due to the height of the waves.  In order for it to run, waves much reach at least 20 feet, which has rarely happened.  However, surfers were very happy that the competition could be held with waves of such magnitude.

 

http://adventureblog.nationalgeographic.com/2016/02/26/50-foot-swells-beckon-surfers-to-hawaii-why-are-the-waves-so-big/

 

U.S. Importing 18 Elephants from Africa

apesWithin the last few months, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) approved a permit that would allow the import of 18 elephants-3 male, 15 female-to the United States.  These 18 elephants will be distributed between 3 zoos, Dallas Zoo, Sedwick County Zoo, and the Henry Doorly Zoo.  The elephants are being imported for mating purposes and will be put on exhibit.  However, the FWS are facing a law suit because Friends of the Animals, an advocacy group based in Connecticut says that it is morally wrong to remove these elephants from their homes in Africa in order to put them in a zoo in America.

 

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/02/160218-elephants-zoos-swaziland-cites-fish-and-wildlife-service/

 

 

Mediterranean Left Out of Climate Plan

In the recent climate plan that was drawn up by many global leaders in Europe, the Mediterranean Sea was left out the plan for environmental help. Due to the major rising temperature and the migrating of different fish that are indigenous to the river, the global leaders could not all agree on how to solve the issue so they decided to leave it out of the plan until they can collectively agree on how to deal with this major issue.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/12/151209-Paris-climate-change-oceans-Mediterranean-Seychelles-fish/

Mediterranean Left Out of Climate Plan

In the recent climate plan that was drawn up by many global leaders in Europe, the Mediterranean Sea was left out the plan for environmental help.  Due to the major rising temperature and the migrating of different fish that are indigenous to the river, the global leaders could not all agree on how to solve the issue so they decided to leave it out of the plan until they can collectively agree on how to deal with this major issue.

 

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/12/151209-Paris-climate-change-oceans-Mediterranean-Seychelles-fish/

 

Largest Freshwater Fish Found?

Recently scientists that were working in the Mae Klong River caught a sting ray that they compare to the size of a car.  They were not able to weigh the animal without hurting it, but can estimate that it is about 800-900 lbs.  Upon measuring it, they found that it is about 7.9 feet long and 14 feet across.  This finding puts it in the running for one of the largest freshwater fish ever recorded.  They cannot be certain about this idea, but scientists are almost certain that it will be the largest freshwater fish recorded.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/03/150311-giant-stingray-largest-freshwater-fish-thailand-whiptail-animals/

 

 

Odd Nosed Antelope Experience Mass Die-Off

Ever heard of odd nosed antelope?  Neither have most people.  This species is indigenous to Central Asia, especially Kazakhstan.  These antelope can also be called saiga noses, because of their rounded nose.  This past Spring, an unknown disease hit the odd nosed antelope of Central Asia.  This species was nearly halved, and 200,000 individuals were lost because of this disease.  These antelope can also be called saiga noses, because of their rounded nose.  Scientists predict that while there is a possibility of their species survival, they predict that growth rate will begin to decrease because of this huge loss.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/11/151104-saiga-antelope-animals-science-world-noses/odd nosed antelope

Palau-The Nation’s New Ocean Preserve

The small Western Pacific island of Palau has just approved the creation of an ocean preserve, about 500,000km (193,000 square miles).  This small island is about the size of New York City and will now be completely protected from the dangers of the open ocean.  Congress has approved the proposal of making 80% of the terrestrial water unusable to humans and their activities.  This includes fishing and mining.  They agreed that the other 20% will be open to local fisherman and small commercial ships carrying goods, but making sure the activities are extremely limited as to not effect the island’s preserve.

Here is a picture of where the island is located, and the approved sanctuary

apes

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/10/151022-palau-marine-protected-area-oceans-animals-conservation/